Friday, August 21, 2015

Alamo Square

From CityLab:

...New York City and San Francisco are far and away the most expensive places to rent in America. Even people with six-figure incomes cannot afford the median rent for a one-bedroom apartment in these cities’ most expensive neighborhoods. No wonder housing affordability has become a leading, if not the leading, political issue in San Francisco and New York. What remains to be seen is whether such incredibly high rents will begin to stifle and suffocate the very diversity and creative energy that have long powered these neighborhoods and cities.

25 U.S. Neighborhoods with the Highest Monthly Median Rent

RankRegion NameMetroRent/Month
1Bel AirLos Angeles$10,629
2Pacific PalisadesLos Angeles$7,987
3Beverly GlenLos Angeles$7,667
4BrentwoodLos Angeles$7,403
5Poet's QuarterLos Angeles$7,075
6Jordan Park-Laurel HeightsSan Francisco$7,000
7La GorceMiami-Fort Lauderdale$6,932
8LakeSan Francisco$6,521
9Cow HollowSan Francisco$6,471
10Pacific HeightsSan Francisco$6,380
11RiversideStamford$6,380
12Financial DistrictSan Francisco$6,373
13MarinaSan Francisco$6,362
14Parnassus-AshburySan Francisco$6,196
15Forest HillSan Francisco$5,891
16Berkley/Foxhall CrescentsWashington$5,868
17Kings PointNew York$5,763
18Spring ValleyWashington$5,740
19Eureka Valley-Dolores Heights-CastroSan Francisco$5,665
20ChelseaNew York$5,649
21Noe ValleySan Francisco$5,560
22Hollywood HillsLos Angeles$5,557
23Baywood KnollsSan Francisco$5,531
24Cheviot HillsLos Angeles$5,511
25Russian HillSan Francisco$5,486

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4 Comments:

At 10:10 AM, Anonymous sfthen said...

CitiLab, "What remains to be seen is whether such incredibly high rents will begin to stifle and suffocate the very diversity and creative energy that have long powered these neighborhoods and cities."

Do these CitiLab/ SPUR people have their eyes open? The "very diversity and creative energy" began disappearing around the first dot-com era beginning 1998 and the disappearances has only accelerated since.

It's no coincidence that 'SPUR' stood for 'Urban Renewal,' the freeways and neighborhood razing they did fifty years ago is being repeated today by bringing these professed 'urbanists' demanding bike lanes and pocket parks. The deleterious effect on established communities and neighborhoods might in the long run be even greater.

It's too late, no matter how much "below many rate" housing is built there will never be any going back to a time when there was real "diversity and creative energy." The SPUR types have won, they've turned SF into a suburban bedroom community. Now it's all Goggle buses and bicycles. Real diversity, real creative energy. Look no further than Scott Wiener.

 
At 1:16 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

There was a book published in the late 90s called EDGE CITY that predicted that San Francisco would become a historic urban Disneyland for young affluent childless professionals to "experience" city life, but in their own sanitary way without the true economic or racial diversity they secretly abhor. Noe Valley's greatest reason for turning into one of the most expensive neighborhood's in "the city" is because it is close to freeways that take young techies to their high paying jobs in the suburban office parks of the South Bay. We are experiencing our city being re-designed by people who grew up in suburbs and want San Francisco to have the same atmosphere. An example..."Market Street needs to be made so that children could feel safe biking down it" (read this on Streetsblog)....can you imagine someone in Chicago or New York saying that 5th Avenue or Michigan Avenue needs to be re-designed so that children could feel "safe" biking on them?

 
At 8:48 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

We are experiencing our city being re-designed by people who grew up in suburbs and want San Francisco to have the same atmosphere

--> "Our city"? LOL. Not your city.

"We are experiencing our city being re-designed by people who grew up in suburbs and want San Francisco to have the same atmosphere. An example..."Market Street needs to be made so that children could feel safe biking down it""

--> Are you under the mistaken impression it is safe for a child to ride a bike in the suburbs?

 
At 9:40 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Do you really think it is an appropriate goal for Market Street to be re-designed so that it is "safe" for children to bike on? I would rather see Market Street become more like Michigan Avenue in Chicago than Lincoln Avenue in Calistoga.

 

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